Wednesday, August 15, 2018
      CMRE Facebook page  CMRE LinkedIn page  CMRE PAO Youtube page
   
Text Size
CMRE banner

Formal Reports

Report of results of completed projects or major milestones either in scientific terms or in terms acceptable to a wider audience. Note: Unless linked to the full text, reports are only available to NATO member nations from designated distribution centres. 

Documents

Order by : Name | Date | Hits [ Ascendant ]

Using Bayesian area search behaviours in autonomous underwater sensor networks for littoral surveillance Using Bayesian area search behaviours in autonomous underwater sensor networks for littoral surveillance

Date added: 02/01/2016
Date modified: 02/01/2016
Filesize: Unknown

Using Bayesian area search behaviours in autonomous underwater sensor networks for littoral surveillance. Munafò, Andrea; Braca, Paolo; Goldhahn, Ryan A.; Ferri, Gabriele; LePage, Kevin D. CMRE-FR-2015-020. December 2015.

IIn this report a multistatic network of AUVs is considered, where a collaborative multi-sensor tracker is coupled with Bayesian search behaviours to go beyond the individual sensor limitations. The Distributed Information FUSION (DIFFUSION) approach is developed based on a Bayes filter implemented in the form of a particle filter within the Random Finite Set (RFS) formulation. The output of the particle filter tracker, namely the target full posterior, is then used by an area search behaviour which is able to drive the AUVs to put the areas of high probability of detections in locations where the target is most likely located. A full validation of the approach is presented including post-processed data obtained during the Exercise Proud Manta 2012 sea trial, and real-time results from the Littoral Continuous Active Sonar 2015 experiment, the first sea trial where all the components presented were operating in the field.

  

Using a vertical line array and ambient noise to obtain measurements of seafloor reflection loss Using a vertical line array and ambient noise to obtain measurements of seafloor reflection loss

Date added: 03/01/2005
Date modified: 08/14/2012
Filesize: Unknown

Using a vertical line array and ambient noise to obtain measurements of seafloor reflection loss. Victor Young. SR-410. March 2005.

Bottom reflection properties can be obtained from ambient noise directionality. The results obtained at six sites in 2002 with NURC’S 62m VLA are summarised. At four of the sites the VLA was moored, in order to study a single seafloor environment, while at the other two sites the VLA was allowed to drift, in order to study geographical changes in the seafloor environment. Several variants of the measurement and processing techniques are investigated here. Firstly, rather than using only the uniformly spaced central section of a nested vertical array (VLA), one can expand the useful size of the array to about three quarters (rather than one half) of the full array length by padding out the array’s correlation matrix. The padding makes the apparently good assumption that the noise crossspectral-density matrix is Toeplitz. Thus the initially sparse matrix for the outer sections of the array (with wider hydrophone separations) can be filled out with values from elsewhere in the true matrix. This provides better angular resolution which is beneficial for the method. Secondly, the possibility of synthesising a VLA with a pair of hydrophones is investigated. The benefit of a synthetic aperture would be the lower cost of the equipment in an operational context. For the process to work (without extremely long integration times) the noise source spatial distribution needs to be stationary.

Users requirement document on next generation of EO ocean colour sensors Users requirement document on next generation of EO ocean colour sensors

Date added: 12/19/2014
Date modified: 12/19/2014
Filesize: Unknown

Users requirement document on next generation of EO ocean colour sensors.  Trees, Charles C. CMRE-FR-2014-023. November 2014.

There is not one quintessential remotely sensed ocean colour EO sensor or orbital platform that will answer all research questions and operational management decisions. Unfortunately, it will take a mixture of both Low Earth and Geostationary Orbit platforms with multi-spectral and hyper-spectral passive sensors, as well as active sensors, like LiDARs, to address the variety of users? needs and their required derived products. Additional analyses will have to be made to establish uncertainty budgets on these products, as well as a comparison of radiometric data and products from the various planned ocean colour sensor missions. Using the proposed International Network for Sensor InTercomparison and Uncertainty assessment for Ocean-Colour Radiometry (INSITU-OCR) by the International Ocean Colour Coordinating Group (IOCCG), protocols will have to be established for combining these various satellite systems and sensors to generate a consistent and accurate coastal and oceanic bio-optical time series. What seems to be lacking is an international to individual governmental efforts at maintaining a satellite-based constellation of ocean colour EO sensors for operational users. There needs to be coordinated efforts to combine resources, share sensor technology and platforms and freely exchange remotely sensed data so that end users receive their derived products with associated uncertainties in a near-real time manner for management, mitigation and policy decisions.

Unmanned systems, autonomy, and side-looking sonar: a framework for integrating contemporary systems into the operational MCM architecture Unmanned systems, autonomy, and side-looking sonar: a framework for integrating contemporary systems into the operational MCM architecture

Date added: 12/11/2013
Date modified: 12/11/2013
Filesize: Unknown

Unmanned systems, autonomy, and side-looking sonar: a framework for integrating contemporary systems into the operational MCM architectures. Percival, Aaron M. ; Couillard, Michel ; Midtgaard, Øivind ; Fox, Warren L. J. CMRE-FR-2013-013. December 2013.

The aim of this report is to provide a common framework for integrating modern systems into the operational Mine Countermeasures (MCM) architecture. This work is necessary as current NATO MCM doctrine and planning/decision aids were designed for traditional ship-based systems. This report outlines the differences between traditional and modern systems, namely the nature of the sensor used (forwardlooking versus side-looking) and the prosecution of the MCM process flow (all processes performed in stride by a single unit versus a separate Search-Classify- Plot and Identification-Neutralization system). The consequences of these differences are shown to make assumptions made for traditional systems invalid for modern systems. From this, the report compiles the outputs necessary for a modern system to comply with operational requirements. This forms the basis of the proposed framework, which was developed to ensure that the correct measures of effectiveness, ones relevant to the operational picture, are used to evaluate modern systems. The framework also expands on the traditional process flow, in order to leverage advantages gained from autonomy and modern sensors. The proposed framework describes a general system. Each of the inputs and processes are subject to the specific capabilities (e.g., sensors and level of autonomy) of each system. The framework is meant to provide a common approach to transition scientific systems to successful operational ones.

Unmanned surface vehicles for harbour protection Unmanned surface vehicles for harbour protection

Date added: 11/01/2007
Date modified: 06/22/2012
Filesize: Unknown

Unmanned surface vehicles for harbour protection. Pastore, T.J. NURC-FR-2007-022. November 2007.

NURC has conducted a technology survey of Unmanned Surface Vehicles (USVs) as part of the Scientific Programme of Work in Harbour Protection. The assessment was based on vendor information, trade publications, scientific journals, and personal contacts with developers. The report includes an extensive bibliography and a tabular presentation of the characteristics of approximately fifty USVs. The utility of USVs in the context of Harbour Protection missions was assessed, and conclusions were drawn based on results reported to date in the field.

User Login