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Formal Reports

Report of results of completed projects or major milestones either in scientific terms or in terms acceptable to a wider audience. Note: Unless linked to the full text, reports are only available to NATO member nations from designated distribution centres. 

Documents

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MX 05 Trial Report: MCM with Autonomous Underwater Vehicles & the Standing NATO MCM Group 1 in Open Spirit 06 MX 05 Trial Report: MCM with Autonomous Underwater Vehicles & the Standing NATO MCM Group 1 in Open Spirit 06

Date added: 08/01/2007
Date modified: 06/22/2012
Filesize: Unknown

MX 05 Trial Report: MCM with Autonomous Underwater Vehicles & the Standing NATO MCM Group 1 in Open Spirit 06. Yip, H.; Baralli, F.; Bovio, E.; Cernich, F.; Reed, S.; Rehr, B. NURC-FR-2007-003. August 2007.

This report documents the activities and results from a military experimentation that took place in OPEN SPIRIT 06, Estonia. Allied Command Transformation (ACT) funded this experimentation. The NATO Research Centre conducted the experimentation in partnership with the Standing NATO MCM Group 1, the Estonian Navy, and ACT. The aims of the experimentation were to assess the effectiveness of contact acquisition with multiple-look analysis on the MCM efficiency, and to demonstrate the effectiveness of COTS AUV used in conjunction with NATO MCMV in an MCM environment with historical ordnances.

NATO Harbour Protection Trials 2006 (HPT06) Analyst Report: Harbour Surveillance Systems NATO Harbour Protection Trials 2006 (HPT06) Analyst Report: Harbour Surveillance Systems

Date added: 08/01/2007
Date modified: 06/22/2012
Filesize: Unknown

NATO Harbour Protection Trials 2006 (HPT06) Analyst Report: Harbour Surveillance Systems. Kessel, R.T. NURC-FR-2007-004. August 2007.

NATO’s Harbour Protection Trials (HPT06), La Spezia, 3-7 April 2006, demonstrated systems for hull search, underwater pier inspection, mine and improvised explosive device (IED) detection, and harbour surveillance. An analyst team lead by NURC was struck to assess in particular the technology readiness of the systems. This report is the first of several planned, giving introductory background to HPT06 and analyzing the six underwater surveillance systems demonstrated in the trials. Three technology groups were represented in this portion of the demonstrations: active sonar (4 systems), passive sonar (1), and one passive magnetic “trip-wire” (1). The systems were installed near the end of a pier in the inner harbour. Divers staged simulated intrusions toward each system over the course of two days. A NATO Technology Readiness Level was assigned to each, and performance was assessed in terms of the probability of detection insofar as it could be determined from the observations. The methodology and results are described.

MX 04 Trial Report: Black Sea Port & Harbour Protection with Autonomous Underwater Vehicles MX 04 Trial Report: Black Sea Port & Harbour Protection with Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

Date added: 08/01/2007
Date modified: 06/22/2012
Filesize: Unknown

MX 04 Trial Report: Black Sea Port & Harbour Protection with Autonomous Underwater Vehicles. Yip, H.; Baralli, F.; Bovio, E.; Cernich, F.; Reed, S.; Rehr, B. NURC-FR-2007-014. August 2007.

This report documents the activities and results from a Military Experimentation that took place in the harbours of Varna and Burgas, Bulgaria. The experimentation was funded by Allied Command Transformation (ACT), and conducted in partnership with the Bulgarian Navy and the Bulgarian Institute ofMetal Sciences. The aim of the experiment was to demonstrate and assess the effectiveness of Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV) combined with Computer Aided Detection (CAD) and related technologies to counter terrorist placement of UnderWater Improvised Explosive Devices (UWIED) in ports and harbours.

Analysis of model-based automatic target recognition using the statistical theory of shape Analysis of model-based automatic target recognition using the statistical theory of shape

Date added: 08/01/2007
Date modified: 06/22/2012
Filesize: Unknown

Analysis of model-based automatic target recognition using the statistical theory of shape. Myers, V.; Couillard, M. NURC-FR-2007-016. August 2007.

This report investigates the use of shape theory in automated target recognition (ATR). The acoustic shadows cast by proud or partially buried objects on the seafloor are compared to theoretical shadows obtained with a ray tracing model. The shape of these shadows is treated as a mathematical object and statistical tools are used to extract information from a large dataset obtained during the Citadel sea trial in October 2005. Results are obtained for ATR with nearest neighbour and support vector machine classifiers using a feature which is the Procrustes shape similarity distance between a measured shadow and one obtained by the ray-trace model. The Hausdorff and Hamming distance measures are added as features to improve classification performance. Then, some hypothesis testing using the multivariate T2 test is performed to analyse populations of shapes of the shadows of truncated cones and rocks. The tests show that the mean measured rock and truncated cone shapes are statistically different from each other; however the same is true for the measured and modelled populations of cones . This multivariate test also underlines the inherent difficulties of comparing real images to modelled ones.

Remote deployment of NURC Ground Station (2-16 November 2005) Remote deployment of NURC Ground Station (2-16 November 2005)

Date added: 07/01/2007
Date modified: 06/22/2012
Filesize: Unknown

Remote deployment of NURC Ground Station (2-16 November 2005). McCarthy, E.; Stenvoll, R.; Turgutcan, F.; Ranelli, P. NURC-FR-2007-013. July 2007.

The NURC Remote Sensing Ground Station was deployed over a 2 week period in November 2005. The antenna was dismantled at the NURC site and transported by flatbed truck to a remote site at an Italian military installation in Aulla, Italy where it was re-assembled. Within 24 hours of re-assembly, it was fully operational. All scheduled passes were successfully down linked. Over 20 passive and active images were received in real-time from several satellites including RADARSAT, TERRA, AQUA and ENVISAT. The Ground Station operated without event from 10-16 November. It was then dismantled within 24 hours and re-assembled at NURC. The remote deployment of such large equipment (the antenna is 5.4 meters in diameter) requires a significant amount of planning. To this end, this report details for potential users the effort required to remotely deploy the ground station, the logistics and support required, as well as the processes. This includes site preparation, power requirements, environmental conditions, and communications necessary.

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